Although our media are vastly different, Chuck Siwinski and I share an understanding of visual appeal. I work primarily documenting the Georgia coast through photography while Chuck works in oil paint to create facial iconography inspired by organic shapes in nature. Our bodies of work stand apart from each other. As such, our idea is to show our work separately within the same space. The idea is to create stark contrast and juxtaposition between the two bodies of work and to simultaneously draw attention to both from the same audience. Oil and water.  Black and white documentary work of the aquatic natural landscape shown alongside colorful oil paintings. Unity by direct opposition. The photos presented here represent work made for the show leading up to the show itself. 


Oil and water for me is a body of work that feels at home in transition, comfortable in those in-between moments of stability, grounded in uncertainty; a seemingly paradoxical combination. My time on the Georgia coast was brief, and this body of work is how I made a home in that space. The photographs embody the spaces and landscapes of coastal Georgia with tension: a van parked on the side of the road just before a torrential thunderstorm; Spanish moss draped over calm swamp water concealing anything below. The South, generally speaking, is a region of juxtaposition and contrast. The culture is rooted in down-home hospitality yet holds on to a rich artistic tradition of southern gothic and the grotesque. I wanted to create work that shows the unsettling nature, the marsh that still holds mysteries, and the overgrown palmettos and oaks. Yet I also wanted to document the beauty and what would become my home and a dear part of my life.